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The Fujiya Hotel 3 – Kaiseki Dinner at Kikka-so

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August 9, 2013 by IPAlchemist

Even though the Fujiya is not, as I have said, Western, but rather Western-influenced Japanese, it seems it could not stay even that way for long, and so after WW II it annexed a Japanese-style lodging that became the Kikka-so Inn.  Apparently the building was originally built as an Imperial villa in 1895 and was used by the Imperial royal family until it was purchased by the Fujiya.  It must have been very odd in the first half of the 20th century having Japanese royalty staying just metres away from a busy resort hotel that was actively attracting customers from all over Japan and the world. So, having eaten my first night at the flagship restaurant of the hotel which served exquisite French food (of which alas no photos were taken), tonight it was off to the Kikka-so for a Japanese kaiseki dinner. Kaiseki is basically a tasting menu that is reminiscent of nouvelle cuisine because of the simple fact that it inspired it.  It has very strict rules, however, and the courses follow a set and predictable order.  The food is highly seasonal, and so if you have a kaiseki dinner at two completely different establishments on consecutive days, you will likely find remarkable similarities in what you receive. I am no expert, but I think that the basic order generally runs something like this (the terms are my own): Pre-appetiser Appetiser Soup (usually clear) Sashimi Grilled dish Steamed dish Fried dish Vinegared dish Rice, miso soup, pickles Dessert (usually fruit and/or sorbet) But look it up on ‘tinternet if you want to know more.  (By the way I am not talking about the “kaiseki” which has something to do with the kanji for “stone” and is related to the tea ceremony – as my Japanese teacher always used to say – “different kanji”). I have never before photographed an entire kaiseki meal, but this seemed the perfect chance as I was by myself.  Also, somewhat unexpectedly, I was in a private room “Sazanka” which was delightful.  So here is the story in pictures and brief explanation.

The room “Sazanka” in the Kikka-so Inn

The room "Sazanka" in the Kikka-so Inn

  Pre-appetiser

Pre-appetiser

 The pre-appetiser contained crab, corn tofu and a small slice of corn, aloe (which I think is the gelatinous material on the top) and balsamic vinegar.

 

Appetiser

 Appetiser

 The appetiser is a plateful of little mouthfuls of gorgeousness.  At the back, covered in a strip of apple, is a piece of sushi with (apparently) barracuda on the top.  The maple leaf is just for decoration.

 

Soup

Soup

 The soup is usually clear, but this one was not.  In the middle is a ball of rice cake containing fish.  There is a translucent green vegetable that I think is taro stem.

 

SashimiSashimi

 Sashimi is raw fish (sushi isn’t – it may include raw fish but it is the rice underneath that is characteristically sushi).  Bottom left is the bowl of soya sauce for dipping.  Tuna is almost always present, and you can see it there on the right.  I think the one on the left is called suzuki but I am open to correction.  And yes that is a slice of radish with the middle cut out that you can see on top.  Sashimi is almost always served on top of thinly sliced daikon (giant radish) with a shiso leaf on top, which is edible and delicious.  The green blob is wasabi – Japanese horseradish.

 

Grilled dish

Grilled dish

At the top was a delicious confection of abalone, cheese and edamame (kind of bean) served in the abalone shell. I was assured that it contained “bonito guts” but this ingredient did not stand out.  On the left the pink thing is lily bulb coated in plum paste, and the red thing in the middle is a pickled sour plum.  On the right is aubergine with miso paste.

 

Stgeamed dish - covered

Steamed dish – covered

  Steamed dish -uncovered

Steamed dish – uncovered

This steamed dish was a cold one.  It looked so lovely with the pretty paper cover that I photographed it like that, and then close-up with the cover off.  The fish is called “hamo”, which I think is a kind of eel, and that is a shiitake that you can see.  The sauce was delicious and contained sesame and other yummies.

 

Fried dish

Fried dish

 The fried dish was a delight.  The beans are apparently not edamame but gindan – ginkgo nuts.  The thing on the top, surprisingly, was a kind of rice cracker.  At the back was a piece of eel, and underneath are two slices of sweet potato, stuffed with some kind of minced prawn, and then fried.

 

Vinegared dish

Vinegared dish

This was not a triumph.  On the top you can see a scallop which was quite nice, and there was a chilli sauce which was interesting, but the whole thing sat in a slimy sauce and the translucent gelatinous thing you can see is konyaku, which is really best left uneaten.

 

Nearly the End

Nearly the end

 You know you are nearly at the end of a Japanese meal when they serve the rice, miso soup and pickles.  This time the miso soup was replaced by a clear soup, unusually, but you can’t see that because I took the photograph with the lid on.  Today’s pickles featured ginger, aubergine, and melon.  No, really.

 

Dessert

Dessert

 And then the dessert tray.  Fruit, green tea, and a lovely ice-cold towel.  (Did I say I have been sweltering all day?  NEVER come to Japan in the summer.)

So that, folks, is a kaiseki meal.  Gochisou-sama deshita.

 

 


1 comment »

  1. lmjapan says:

    I’m really enjoying reading your posts on the Fujiya Hotel! I didn’t get to eat at this particular restaurant, the foods look really scrumptious! We had lunch in the main dining room and their famous beef curry was wonderful. Then we had dinner in the Western restaurant. I forgot its name, it really wasn’t very good.

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